Morongo Band of Mission Indians
Morongo Band of Mission Indians, Cabazon California

'A Partner to the Community'

Welcome to the Sovereign Nation of the Morongo Band of Mission Indians. The Morongo reservation, established in 1865, is home to about 3,000 tribal members, Set at the foot of the beautiful San Gorgonio and San Jacinto Mountains, the Morongo Indian Reservation spans more than 32,000 acres and overlooks the desert vistas of the Banning Pass. Wild buckwheat, mesquite and chaparral still thrive here, and the ever-present breeze ensures that the air is always fresh and clear.

One of the native names of the Morongo Reservation was Malki, and it was located in what was once called the Wanikik territory. In the mid-19th century, the Serrano people to the north began migrating to the Malki settlement. They brought with them the Morongo name derived from the Serrano name for their people – Maringayam. Since the late 19th century, the Morongo Reservation has been inhabited by the Cahuilla, Serrano, Luiseno and Cupeno peoples.


Like all the American Indians, the Morongo Tribe has overcome untold adversities through resilience and resourcefulness. The Morongo Reservation was one of nine small reservations set aside by President Grant by Executive Order in 1865. The lands taken into trust by the federal government did not include land with access to surface water. Consequently, tribal members had to travel miles each day just to obtain water and to forage for food.Today, through their industrious tenacity in an unstable world the Morongo Tribe now operates one of the oldest, largest and most popular Indian gaming facilities in the United States. What started as a modest bingo hall in 1983 is now a $250 million dollar, 44 acre, 310 room hotel, casino, spa mega structure; The Morongo Casino Resort Spa.

Needless to say, The Morongo Band"s $500,000 annual federal dependency has been virtually erased with the Tribe"s ability to support themselves through gaming and other diverse investment holdings.


The Tribe now pays for a wide range of its community services including water storage and distribution systems, waste management, road maintenance, public safety, college education funding, recreational facilities, headstart program assistance and more. The Morongo Band is also heavily involved in the local community through sponsorship, leadership, and financial contributions.

The Morongo Tribe is the largest private sector employer in the Banning-Beaumont region and a major contributor to the Coachella Valley economy to the tune of over $2.8 billion dollars in 2008. The Tribe presently employs more than 3000 people in both gaming and non-gaming tribal operations and is poised to continue well into the future securing its heritage for generations to come.